Crushed Red Peppers can be traced back to Central and South America. They have been cultivated for more than seven thousand years. It was not until the 15th century that red peppers were introduced to the rest of the world. In traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda, a traditional form of Indian medicine, red peppers have been used to treat digestive problems, circulatory problems, infections, and arthritis.

Red Peppers May Help With Weight Loss

Recent research has found that dried red pepper flakes may be an appetite suppressant for people who are not used to the spice. Results showed that adding the flakes to the diet daily decreased feelings of hunger in test subjects who did not normally eat them. These same subjects found they craved fatty, salty, and sweet foods less. Only those who were not used to the flakes were affected by the dried pepper’s appetite-suppressing effects.

Are Red Peppers Full of Antioxidants?

In a recent study, researchers found that three different types of peppers (pasilla, guajillo, and ancho) contained carotenoids. These pigments give the peppers their color, but they are also beneficial to your health. The carotenoids act as antioxidants that protect your tissues and cells from the dangers posed by free radicals. These radicals play a crucial part in increasing bodily pain.

Will Red Peppers Boost the Immune System?

The bright red color of the chili flakes says that it is high in beta-carotene. Beta-carotene gets converted to vitamin A which is essential for healthy mucous membranes. These membranes line the nasal passages, lungs, intestinal tract, and urinary tract, which serve as the body’s first line of defense against pathogens trying to get into our bodies. Plus, red pepper flakes contain vitamin C, which is needed for a healthy immune system.

Red Peppers are Heart-Healthy

Research has shown that crushed red pepper reduces blood cholesterol, triglyceride levels, and platelet aggregation. These peppers have been found to aid in helping the body to dissolve fibrin, a substance integral to the formation of blood clots. Studies have found that in areas where people eat hot peppers regularly in their diet, they have a much lower rate of heart attack, stroke, and pulmonary embolism. One study found that people who ate hot peppers had a rate of oxidation much lower in both men and women. Plus, women had a longer lag time before damage by cholesterol was seen.

Red Peppers May Improve Digestive Health

One of the amazing health benefits of red peppers is that it improves digestive health. The capsaicin in red pepper stimulates the digestive tract, which helps to improve digestion. This increased activity also helps to clear out any blockages that might be present. In addition, capsaicin has been shown to increase the production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach. It is essential because this acid is responsible for breaking down food so the body can absorb the nutrients.

Red Peppers May Help Relieve Pain

Capsaicin, the compound that makes chili pepper hot, is also being studied for its ability to relieve pain. This compound works by depleting the substance P, a neurotransmitter that carries pain signals to the brain. When capsaicin depletes substance P, the pain signals are no longer sent to the brain, resulting in decreased pain. This finding has led to the development of topical creams containing capsaicin to relieve pain associated with arthritis, shingles, and other conditions.

Red Peppers Contain Nutrients That Are Good for Your Bones

Red chili peppers are a good source of vitamins A, C, and K and folic acid. These nutrients are all essential for bone health. Vitamin A is necessary for the absorption of calcium, which is the main mineral found in bones. Vitamin C helps maintain the collagen matrix that gives bones their strength, and vitamin K is necessary for the production of osteocalcin. This protein helps anchor calcium in the bone matrix. Folic acid is essential for the growth and repair of DNA, which is necessary for maintaining healthy bones.

Improve Ocular Health with Red Peppers

One of the ways crushed red pepper benefits our body is that it improves ocular health. Red peppers are a good source of vitamins A and C, essential for ocular health. Vitamin A is necessary for the maintenance of the cornea, while vitamin C is involved in the production of collagen, a protein that helps keep the eyes healthy. In addition, hot chili peppers also contain beta-carotene, which is converted to vitamin A in the body and is also essential for eye health. Beta-carotene has been shown to reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a condition that can lead to blindness.

Red Peppers are Beneficial for Diabetics

Studies have found that crushed red peppers may aid in the amount of insulin required to lower blood sugar after a meal. Promising results have found that insulin requirements drop even lower if crushed peppers are regularly consumed. One study found that overweight people had lower amounts of insulin required to lower their blood sugar levels after a meal. Nutritionists also found that it is not just the capsaicin, but the antioxidants, including vitamin C and carotenoids, which might help to improve insulin regulation.

Dr. Partha Nandi Recommended Recipes with Crushed Red Peppers

Roasted Red Bell Pepper Sauce

Click here to get the Roasted Red Bell Pepper Sauce recipe instructions. This recipe works well for flank steak, served over chicken or served as a dip with vegetables

Easy Papaya Stir Fry

Click here to get the cooking instructions for the Easy Papaya Stir Fry recipe.

Shakshuka Recipe

Click here to get the cooking instructions for the Shakshuka Recipe. 

Vegan Eggplant Parmesan

Click here to get the cooking instructions for the Vegan Eggplant Parmesan recipe.

Want more recipes with Crushed Red Peppers? Click here!

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References:

  1. Red Pepper: Health Benefits, Nutrients, Preparation, and More (webmd.com)
  2. 6 Potential Health Benefits of Cayenne Pepper (healthline.com)

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