Phases of Vaccine Roll Out

Health Care Workers will be first as they are on the frontlines and most likely to be exposed.  That includes anyone working in the health care setting who has a chance for exposure on a daily basis.  This would also include anyone most at risk of server complications with COVID, like anyone 65 years of age or older and those with underlying health conditions. This would also include those who work at facilities where things like social distancing and sanitation are harder like homeless shelters and prisons.

The next group of people with access would be essential workers like grocery store workers and mail deliverers.

Finally, it would be made available for all.

Vaccine Locations

First, we would see the vaccine available in hospitals, then health care clinics, then medical offices, and finally pharmacies.  If a second shot is required you would probably receive a text or email reminder to go in for your second time.

Vaccines in the Game

Because of unexplained illnesses in participants, both Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca vaccine trials are on pause in the US.  The details have not yet been laid out but we should know more soon.  The other two vaccines are from Pfizer and Moderna.  Pfizer is experiencing some success and has said they hope to apply for the FDA’s emergency use authorization in late November.  While Moderna is on track for December. In order to apply for emergency use authorization, vaccine candidates must wait for a specific number of coronavirus cases to occur.  So that there’s enough data to show that the vaccine is both effective and safe.

Once a vaccine is approved I will feel confident getting it for a few reasons.  Most importantly because the requirements to be fast-tracked for emergency authorization are so vast, and all data will be scrutinized and combed through meticulously.  Once a vaccine is given the green light, then I believe people should feel confident that it’s safe and that it’s been properly tested by our scientific community.